The burning of the Koran in Sweden teaches that the market of ideas must be regulated

The burning of the Koran in Sweden teaches that the market of ideas must be regulated

The possible attack surface of a system determines its tightness and stability. The larger the surface, the more possible entry points to attack the system. In a world which, despite the polycrises we hear about every day, is still flat in some essential aspects, according to the well-known argument proposed by Thomas Friedman, burn a holy book in the public square in a European city it can trigger uncontrolled reactions that threaten the stability and safety of things and people thousands of kilometers away. For many Western commentators this dynamic is incomprehensible. For years we have fed on theories of secularization and believed that religions were destined to become marginal in the lives of men. Victims of the short-sightedness of secularization we fail to understand how it is possible that millions of people can take to the streets, demonstrate and arrive at decisions that seem absolutely implausible to us in the context of the epistemology of the world that we have built for ourselves.

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